HUMAN HERITABLE TRAITS

Copyright © 2006, D. B. Fankhauser, Professor of Biology and Chemistry 
University of Cincinnati Clermont College,
Batavia OH 45103
This page has been accessed Counter times since 2 February 2006.
Created 27 January 2006, edited 2 February 2006

Genetics text sources used to suppliment this list:      Griffiths et al,7th  p 426,
                                                                               Klug and Cummings, 4th:  p 69
                                                                               Tamarin 4th : p 82-87

The following is a list of genetic traits which are heritable in humans.  Remember that a person displaying the recessive trait is homozygous, and cannot transmit the dominant form of the trait to his or her progeny.  Alternatively, a person displaying the dominant trait (phenotype) may be either homozygous, in which case all of the progeny will display the trait, or heterozygous, in which there is a 50% chance that any given offspring will display the trait if the other mate displays the recessive trait.

Non-pathological:
 

DOMINANT TRAIT RECESSIVE TRAIT (Allelic to left column)
Brown eyes
PTC taster
Widow's Peak 
Middigital hair
Tongue roller
Detached earlobe
A and B blood type (codominant)
Rh positive blood type
Pattern baldness (dominant in males)
Blue eyes (more complex, simplified here)
PTC non taster
Lack Widow’s peak
Hairless mid digits
Cannot roll tongue
Attached earlobe
Type O blood type
Rh negative blood type
Pattern baldness (recessive in females)

   Pathological:
 

DOMINANT TRAITS RECESSIVE TRAITS (Not alleles of left column)
Achondroplasia
Brachydactyly
Congenital stationary night blindness
Ehler-Danlos syndrome
Fascio-scapulo-humeral muscular dystrophy
Huntington disease
Hypercholesterolemia
Marfan Syndrome
Nail-patella syndrome
Neurofibromatosis
Polydactyly
Albinism
Alkaptonuria
Atasia telangiectasia
Color blindness
Cystic fibrosis
Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Galactosemia
Hemophilia
Lesch-Nyhan syndrome
Phenylketonuria
Sickle-cell anemia
Tay-Sachs disease